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Wonderful video about creativity. 

A new dimension of geeky. I suspect Rachel Maddow would approve. :)

She was in the conference room, pouring a cup of coffee, when the other company’s executives and lawyers walked in. They proceeded to discuss the lowest bid they would accept, as if she wasn’t there. ‘They assumed I was the admin,’ or secretary, she says. When the group sat down to negotiate, she adds, ‘Their faces went white as ghosts.’

Honestly, it’s unbelievable that this is still happening. I look forward to being part of the generation that beats this attitude. 

so fucking great

Why So Few Women in Silicon Valley? - NYT (via nickdouglas)

(via fred-wilson)

Wow. Detroit’s abandoned neighborhoods look like this. Courtesy of Shrinking cities website. 

This is a picture by George Steinmetz that I discovered in this week’s New Yorker.  Such a great city! What I love about this picture is not just the obvious density of the city but also the way in which space is carved into the roofs.  It’s silly to call it like that, but it feels almost like a negative-space from the top! 

This is a picture by George Steinmetz that I discovered in this week’s New Yorker.  Such a great city! What I love about this picture is not just the obvious density of the city but also the way in which space is carved into the roofs.  It’s silly to call it like that, but it feels almost like a negative-space from the top! 

Priceless: Young Steve Jobs presents at the whiteboard.  Venturehacks, where I found this, is such an awesome website! 

Uncertain about Lee Jang Sub's Complex cities

An aesthetic look at how cities develop from a road point of view… but isn’t this grossly oversimplifying the subject of complex cities? I feel that if he wanted to be part of the city-organism discussion (a super old discourse!), he could have made his complexity argument a lot richer.  On their own, the pictures are quite beautiful though. Thoughts?

Another interesting TED talk, this time on architecture: Liz Diller’s discussion of several of their projects. Love the picture of the original testosterone Lincoln Center model from the 60s. 

The wiki guide into building memory palaces

An interesting description of how to build a memory palace.  For more information on memory palaces, you should check out my first post called “Strolling through memories.” 

From Elana’s wall.  I like the obvious way it proposes to just remove 3d space.  Besides, it’s also a strong statement for appropriate shrinkage of the city.

From Elana’s wall.  I like the obvious way it proposes to just remove 3d space.  Besides, it’s also a strong statement for appropriate shrinkage of the city.

Very cool Jane McGonigal TED lecture video, where she talks about how you can save the world playing games. Totally recommend watching it! 

Solaris = wonderfully spent three hours

When I first saw Tarkovsky’s Stalker in a cinema at the age of sixteen, it made such a strong impression on me that I went to see it again within a week.  In the end, I saw it at least three times.  It might have been the same year when my intellectual high school classmates and I refused to give any merit to Titanic, except perhaps for the historically accurate costumes (though none of us could judge the film anyway since no one actually went to see it).    

Yesterday I saw Tarkovsky’s Solaris.  I immediately wanted to see it again.  At least three times.  Coincidentally, it was around the same time when Peter saw Titanic for the first time on a plane (heading out of the UK into the hurricane-like wind in the New York area this weekend) and rejoiced that he was spared the final Leonardo-died-moment because BA turned in-flight entertainment off in time for that moment. 

For sure, Solaris-time = wonderfully spent three hours.  

The film is an intimate rumination on which memories people decide to keep prominently in their minds and how they can materialize three-dimensionally.  The main character, psychologist Kris Kelvin arrives at the Solaris space station, which is floating in a sea of hopelessness, and rediscovers some of the strongest feelings humans experience: love, loss, fear, guilt, beauty.  At Solaris, people’s minds alter and materialize specific memories and ideas.  Kelvin’s appearance is his ex-wife Hari, who had committed suicide ten years earlier.  He falls in love with her image.  Hari, in turn, gradually begins to become human, so painfully „self-aware“, as Colin Marshall writes in his review, that – in a mirror-like reenacting of her previous existence – she chooses to disappear one more time at the end of the film to allow Kris to return to Earth. 

Hari (a memory visualized in 3d) puts Kris’ world into perspective. Our new online creation will be a Solaris, not a Titanic. Those are the two morals of the story that apply to the business we are creating.

Everyone should go see this film.  

Bukmarking the summer

This salad creates the most wonderful (forward?) memories of the summer.

"She was in the conference room, pouring a cup of coffee, when the other company’s executives and lawyers walked in. They proceeded to discuss the lowest bid they would accept, as if she wasn’t there. ‘They assumed I was the admin,’ or secretary, she says. When the group sat down to negotiate, she adds, ‘Their faces went white as ghosts.’"
Solaris = wonderfully spent three hours

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What happens to memories when you capture them in a 3d city on the internet?

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